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Friday, September 5, 2014

CONTAINER TRACKER


Container Tracking, Ship Schedules and Current Position. Search by Bill of Lading B/L, Shipment or Container number No.
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Container Tracker
Logo Container Line Ships Position Container Tracking Ships Schedules Own Terminals
Maersk Logo
MAERSK
"MAERSK" Ships Tracking
"MAERSK" Container Tracking
Schedules of "MAERSK"
MSC Logo
MSC
"MSC" Ships Tracking
"MSC" Container Tracking Schedules of "MSC"
CMA CGM Logo
CMA CGM
"CMA CGM" Ships Tracking
"CMA CGM" Container Tracking Schedules of "CMA CGM"
Evergreen Line Logo
EVERGREEN
"EVERGREEN" Ships Tracking
"EVERGREEN" Container Tracking Schedules of "EVERGREEN"
COSCO Line Logo
COSCO
"COSCO" Ships Tracking
"COSCO" Container Tracking Schedules of "COSCO"
HAPAG LLOYD Logo
HAPAG-LLOYD
"HAPAG-LLOYD" Ships Tracking
"HAPAG LLOYD" Container Tracking Schedules of "HAPAG LLOYD"
locations
APL Logo
APL
"AMERICAN PRESIDENT LINES" Ships Tracking
"APL" Container Tracking Schedules of "APL"
locations
HANJIN Logo
HANJIN
"HANJIN" Ships Tracking
"HANJIN" Container Tracking Schedules of "HANJIN"
locations
CSCL Logo
CSCL
"CSCL" Ships Tracking
"CSCL" Container Tracking Schedules of "CSCL"
locations
MOL Logo
MOL
"MOL" Ships Tracking
"MOL" Container Tracking Schedules of "MOL"
locations
Hamburg Sud Logo
HAMBURG SÜD
"HAMBURG SUD" Ships Tracking
"HAMBURG SUD" Container Tracking Schedules of "HAMBURG SUD"
locations
NYK Logo
NYK
"NYK" Ships Tracking
"NYK" Container Tracking Schedules of "NYK"
locations
OOCL Logo
OOCL
"OOCL" Ships Tracking
"OOCL" Container Tracking Schedules of "OOCL"
locations
Yang Ming Logo
YANG MING
"YANG MING" Ships Tracking
"YANG MING" Container Tracking Schedules of "YANG MING"
locations

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Container ships are cargo ships that carry all of their load in truck-size intermodal containers, in a technique called containerization. They are a common means of commercial intermodal freight transport and now carry most seagoing non-bulk cargo. Container ship capacity is measured in twenty-foot equivalent units (TEU). Typical loads are a mix of 20-foot and 40-foot (2-TEU) ISO-standard containers, with the latter predominant. Container ships are distinguished into 7 major size categories: small feeder, feeder, feedermax, panamax, post-panamax, new panamax and ultra-large. As of December 2012, there are 161 container ships in the VLCS class (Very Large Container Ships, more than 10,000 TEU), and 51 ports in the world can accommodate them.

Container Ships Current Position Tracking
Preview of Container Ships Current Position Dual Tracking
Container number explained
CONTAINER NUMBER EXPLAINED
Reamark: This image is provided by Wikipedia under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International Public License

The size of a panamax vessel is limited by the Panama canal's lock chambers, which can accommodate ships with a beam of up to 32.31 m, a length overall of up to 294.13 m, and a draft of up to 12.04 m. The "post panamax" category has historically been used to describe ships with a moulded breadth over 32.31 m, however the Panama Canal expansion project is causing some changes in terminology. The "new panamax" category is based on the maximum vessel-size that will be able to transit a new third set of locks. The new locks are being built to accommodate a container ship with a length overall of 366 metres (1,201 ft), a maximum width of 49 metres (161 ft), and tropical fresh-water draft of 15.2 metres (50 ft). Such a vessel would be wide enough to carry 19 rows of containers, have a total capacity of approximately 12,000 TEU and be comparable in size to a capesize bulk carrier or a suezmax tanker. Container ships under 3,000 TEU are generally called feeders. Feeders are small ships that typically operate between smaller container ports. Some feeders collect their cargo from small ports, drop it off at large ports for transshipment on larger ships, and distribute containers from the large port to smaller regional ports. This size of vessel is the most likely to carry cargo cranes on board.

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